Flagstaff History: Bribery attempt went badly for man held on traffic charge | Local

SUSANNAH CARNEY and BRUCE CARL ERTMANN Special to the Daily Sun

100 years ago

1922: Indications are that the trainmen strike, which has never been more than local — Southern California and western Arizona, in particular — is nearing a close. The Big Four brotherhood, which at first gave the train crews permission to strike wherever armed guards were used, has reversed that decision and notified the men that they are striking without authority and will not be supported either morally or financially. Telegraphic bulletins from the Big Four to that effect are posted on the bulletin boards at train stations. Meanwhile, in Flagstaff there has been no intimacy that the Flagstaff Battery D will be ordered out on strike duty. They have not been ordered to mobilize nor has any order come about being in readiness. The trackmen here in Flagstaff have been working steadily. The wages received here are for foremen $117.08. Trackmen get 30¢ per hour. During the war, the foremen received $143.60, and trackmen much more than they are getting now. Then the foreman was cut to $123 a month and the men to 35¢ an hour. Since then, the wages were cut again, to the figures shown above.

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75 years ago

1947: “A major project for the Flagstaff Chamber of Commerce during the coming year will be the promotion of the Schultz Pass Road as an alternate route for northbound travel,” Lloyd Harrell, manager, said today. “About one-third of the westbound travel on Highway 66 is turning north on Highway 89 east of Flagstaff,” he said. “If we could bring these people into the city, and then make it possible for them to go north without retracing their steps to the 66-89 junction, we would benefit immeasurably.” Realizing the loss to Flagstaff business because of the big diversion of traffic on Highway 89 before it reaches the city, the chamber held a special meeting this week to discuss the matter and to make plans to promote the Schultz Pass Road. The chamber will ask the Coconino County Board of Supervisors to call a meeting sometime soon to discuss the proposal, and to study plans to surface and realign the Schultz Pass Road. “The road will not only be shorter, but it is a very beautiful scenic drive,” Harrell said. “It will be easy to maintain, both winter and summer, and will provide an additional treat for the visitor on his way to the Grand Canyon.”

50 years ago

1972: A 45-year-old Flagstaff man has been charged with bribery after allegedly offering a city court official $40 to let him go after court. The charge was filed on Wednesday against Donald L. Guthrie, Snow Bowl Motel, who had been arrested and held earlier on a minor traffic charge. According to a detective, Guthrie allegedly offered Ray Otero, court bailiff and probation officer, the money as he was being taken into court on the traffic charge Wednesday. He was released on his own recognition after being booked into city jail on the charge.

The owner of a large German shepherd dog, allegedly involved in attacks on two people in Flagstaff, has been booked into city jail on a charge of leash law violations. An arresting patrolman of the Flagstaff Police Department said he took into custody John Thomas Blood, 24, of 804 W. Summit Avenue late Wednesday on two warrants charging the violations. A dog owned by Blood allegedly attacked a young man and a teenage boy last weekend, causing both to seek treatment at Flagstaff Community Hospital. The two complaints were signed by a police officer and a private citizen.

Babbitt’s East on Fourth Street has women’s soft touch pantyhose on sale for 99¢ a pair. Not to be outdone, McLellan’s Department Store on N. San Francisco Street is selling the same product for 48¢ a pair. McLellan’s is also appealing to the back-to-school crowd by offering up 500 sheets of five-hole punched filler paper for 77¢.

Language and Culture Learning

Roberta Gorman welcomes a class of second-grade students to her immersive Diné class Wednesday morning at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School on the first day of the new school year.

Exploring On The First Day

Exploring On The First Day

A class of kindergarten students explore their new school Wednesday morning on the first day of the new school year at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School.

First Day of School

First Day of School

Students listen to a story Wednesday morning in the library at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School during the first day of the new school year.

Helping Out Little Brother

Helping Out Little Brother

Totsohnii Yazzie, 13, left, maps out where little brother Eli, 11, will find his classes inside Mount Elden Middle School Wednesday morning on the first day of the new school year. Totsohnii, who is starting his last year at middle school, was making sure Eli was comfortable in his new school on his first day of sixth grade.

Singing in the New School Year

Singing in the New School Year

First-grade teacher Susan Spizzirri leads her class in a song Wednesday morning on the first day of school at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School.

First Day Assembly

First Day Assembly

Boden Kazlo, 12, listens to a school assembly Wednesday morning at Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of school.

School Assembly

School Assembly

Tammy Nelson, principal of Mount Elden Middle School, conducts the first school assembly of the new school year Wednesday morning.

First Day of School

First Day of School

Students listen to expectations for gym class Wednesday morning in the gymnasium at Mount Elden Middle School during the first day of the new school year.

Welcome back

Welcome back

Principal Tammy Nelson makes a schoolwide announcement from her office on the first day of the new school year Wednesday morning at Mount Elden Middle School.

Welcome back

Welcome back

With palpable nervous excitement, students walk through the front door of Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of the new school year Wednesday morning.

First Day of School

First Day of School

Angel Gonzalez, right, waits for a copy of his class schedule Wednesday morning in the dome at Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of the new school year.



Language and Culture Learning

Language and Culture Learning

Roberta Gorman welcomes a class of second-grade students to her immersive Diné class Wednesday morning at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School on the first day of the new school year.



Exploring On The First Day

Exploring On The First Day

A class of kindergarten students explore their new school Wednesday morning on the first day of the new school year at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School.



First Day of School

First Day of School

Students listen to a story Wednesday morning in the library at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School during the first day of the new school year.



Helping Out Little Brother

Helping Out Little Brother

Totsohnii Yazzie, 13, left, maps out where little brother Eli, 11, will find his classes inside Mount Elden Middle School Wednesday morning on the first day of the new school year. Totsohnii, who is starting his last year at middle school, was making sure Eli was comfortable in his new school on his first day of sixth grade.



Singing in the New School Year

Singing in the New School Year

First-grade teacher Susan Spizzirri leads her class in a song Wednesday morning on the first day of school at Puente de Hózhó Elementary School.



First Day Assembly

First Day Assembly

Boden Kazlo, 12, listens to a school assembly Wednesday morning at Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of school.



School Assembly

School Assembly

Tammy Nelson, principal of Mount Elden Middle School, conducts the first school assembly of the new school year Wednesday morning.



First Day of School

First Day of School

Students listen to expectations for gym class Wednesday morning in the gymnasium at Mount Elden Middle School during the first day of the new school year.



Welcome back

Welcome back

Principal Tammy Nelson makes a schoolwide announcement from her office on the first day of the new school year Wednesday morning at Mount Elden Middle School.



Welcome back

Welcome back

With palpable nervous excitement, students walk through the front door of Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of the new school year Wednesday morning.



First Day of School

First Day of School

Angel Gonzalez, right, waits for a copy of his class schedule Wednesday morning in the dome at Mount Elden Middle School on the first day of the new school year.

25 years ago

1997: They come to Flagstaff from Phoenix, California, New York, the Midwest and Europe. Estimates put their number anywhere between two million and five million strong a year, depending on how their overnight stays are counted. They are tourists, and they come to see the Grand Canyon, raid the service station convenience stores, shop at Walmart, grab a fast-food lunch, rest their road-weary eyes in local hotels and stroll through historic downtown. Directly and indirectly, tourism in Flagstaff accounts for more than 20% of all business in town. The hotel industry alone in Flagstaff is worth about $110 million a year. Tourism also pays the bills in Flagstaff. The 2% bed, board and booze tax has raised about $3 million annually.

Tourists whose vehicles breakdown on vacation are not the most chipper people in town. Often, they’re both glum and in a rush to get back on the road. “Mostly they’re in a real hurry,” said Richard Drury, a mechanic at the Butler Shell station at the Interstate 40–Butler Avenue exit. “Most of them expect to be waited on immediately. But we can’t always do that; we take our customers as they come in. It seems to me sometimes people from big cities are in a big rush. They expect things to be done right away. But sometimes we can’t.” Drury takes it all in stride. He’s lived in Flagstaff for the past 25 years and has seen everything. He adds that he enjoys his job because he gets to meet new people every day.

All events were taken from issues of the Arizona Daily Sun and its predecessors, the Coconino Weekly Sun and the Coconino Sun.

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