Phoenix wants to develop these four city-owned pieces of land

Phoenix has its eyes on a few pieces of land that are ripe for development.

What’s happening: The city’s economic development leaders briefed a council subcommittee Wednesday on four city-owned properties they plan to pitch to developers in the next year.

  • The city could decide to sell or lease the land to real estate entities who would bring housing, retail or other projects.

Why it matters: The council has been eager to activate vacant land owned by the Phoenix, especially in areas that are now seeing major economic growth.

24th Street and Broadway Road

This 12-acre site is a redevelopment priority for the south Phoenix community. It’s currently a large vacant lot.

What they’re saying: Community development deputy director Xandon Keating told the subcommittee the city is hosting conversations with surrounding neighborhoods to determine the best use.

  • Phoenix wants an affordable housing development, but Keating said some residents are asking for amenities, such as a grocery store.

Of note: City staff said they are considering a temporary farmers market until a permanent development is determined.

First and McKinley Streets

This parking lot used to serve the downtown Phoenix farmer’s market, but the Phoenix Public Market building was recently demolished to make way for a high-rise apartment complex.

  • The farmers market is now at Fifth and McKinley streets and the parking lot is no longer used.

Details: The lot is about a half-acre, which Keating said is a good-sized development site for the downtown core.

19th and Montebello avenues

This is a park and ride for the light rail, which used to end at this intersection.

  • Now, the light rail is extended farther north and the 10-acre parking lot is underutilized, Keating said.

What’s next: Some of the land may be reserved for future transit uses, but part of it could be repurposed into housing.

16th Street and Wier Avenue

This vacant lot is a little more than 2 acres and will likely be transformed into affordable housing, Keating said.

Meanwhile: Staff also highlighted two small properties on Jefferson Street near 12th and 13th streets.

  • Conversations are ongoing, but because of their proximity to the light rail, they could make for good residential projects.

What we’re watching: We’ve written about Phoenix’s goal to build affordable housing on city-owned land.

  • We’re curious to see if the council develops affordable housing across the city or if it reserves land in pricier parts of the city for more lucrative developments.

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